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Posts Tagged ‘Basque country’

“Sweet dreams are made of this.
Who am I to disagree?
Travel the World and the seven seas;
Everybody’s looking for something.”

If you’re thinking of moving to Tenerife, ask yourself this; “What am I looking for?”

We were invited to a barbeque last weekend, in an exquisite contemporary villa in the south of the island. It was a sumptuous feast and we met lots of new people, some of whom had re-located relatively recently to Tenerife.

During the course of conversations, it was interesting to find out what people were doing; what their expectations were of life on the island and how long they saw themselves living here.

Playa de Las Americas where life can be very good indeed

Playa de Las Americas where life can be very good indeed

Some had grown weary of the demands of life in consumer Britain and had traded long hours in an office for endless days in the surf. Others were investing time and money in setting up new businesses on the island and hoping to combine quality of life with entrepreneurial success.
So far, it seemed like life was living up to expectations for them.

Coincidentally this weekend saw our neighbour Jesús leaving the island and heading back to the Basque Country. It’s doubtful that Jesús will return and it was strange to hear him telling us on Sunday night that he was finally able to see that Tenerife hadn’t been right for him. It was as if he couldn’t see what was in front of his face until he’d made the decision to leave and then the veil was lifted.

We’d often joked to Jesús that he had the money of a pauper and the lifestyle of a rich man, spending all day every day playing golf to the detriment of his wallet, his social life and his health. It was clear to us that Jesús was stagnating in his casita at the bottom of our path but he couldn’t see it until he went back to the Basque Country for a holiday, got some temporary work as a masseur and realised how much happier he was working and socialising.

It got me thinking about what it was that Jack and I had been looking for

Life in the sun, sea and sand in El Medano

Life in the sun, sea and sand in El Medano

when we left Britain and whether we’d found it.
In terms of getting out of the rat race and spending time together in a beautiful environment in which we could spend most of our lives outside, there’s no doubt we’ve achieved that.

We never moved here with the intentions of getting rich – we had enough of that cycle of earning and spending in Britain – but what has been far more difficult than we predicted has been the ability to make a decent living here. To some extent that’s to do with adjusting our expectations; Jack has adapted much better than I have to the vagaries of getting work and the even greater unpredictability of getting paid once you’ve done it. But I’m getting there.

My choice, though clearly not everyones

My choice, though clearly not everyone's

The people I spoke to on Saturday agreed that, having made the initial move from the UK, they wouldn’t hesitate to move again and that’s important to know if you’re scared of leaving everything you’ve ever known; it doesn’t have to be a one way ticket.
For us, when the time is right we’ll simply sell up and move on, but it’s unlikely to be back to the UK if we do. There’s a whole world out there waiting to be discovered and you never really know a place until you’ve spent some time living in it.

Of course, the other thing that separates Jack and I from many of the Brits who re-locate to the island is the fact that we have chosen to live in the north, which for some, would just be a step too far but for us is because we’ve chosen to live in the real Tenerife.

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Life here at Casa Monty has been hectic of late.

All summer we’ve been fully occupied producing a new guide to Tenerife, or should I say the new guide to Tenerife, as it knocks the spots off everything hitherto produced. Jam packed with insightful information, witticisms, priceless tips and tried and tested recommendations, ‘Going Native Tenerife’ should be available on Amazon.co.uk and Amazon.com by the year’s end and will provide a shortcut to the accumulated knowledge and experience of ourselves and others over the course of years spent living on the island.

With the early rains came Teides first snow of the winter

With the early rains came Teide's first snow of the winter

Squeezed into small pockets of leisure time in between researching and writing have been island exploring exploits with visiting friends and family, the latest of whom was Mary, Jack’s mum, for whom tan topping was high on her agenda. Unfortunately, Mary’s trip coincided with the early arrival of the November rains and we’ve had to travel the length and breadth of the island to try to find the illusive ‘sol’, largely without a great deal of success.

So amidst all this activity, it’s hardly surprising that I haven’t had time to keep you up to date with all the goings-on in our very own little patch of Tenerife paradise, including the arrival of our new neighbour.
It was at the beginning of September that we first noticed lights on in the little house (we call it the ‘casita’) that borders our path and a few enquiries at the golf club revealed that indeed someone had moved in.

A week or so passed without sightings of the elusive new resident until one night when we were on our way into town with Bryan who was staying with us at the time. As we closed the gate behind us, a voice called “Hola” in the darkness and we went back through the gate to be greeted by Jesús, our new neighbour.
Not much more than a slip of a lad (mid-twenties), Jesús is from the Basque Country and is lately moved here from Thailand where he has been studying and practicing the ancient massage techniques of Sen healing; the loosening of the flow of energy from the body’s natural network of energy lines in order to alleviate muscular and skeletal problems.

Over the course of the ensuing weeks, we’ve gotten to know Jesús very well and he’s now a regular accompaniment on our Friday morning shopping trips and an habitual visitor to Casa Monty where we have ‘cook-ins’. He’s a very good chef and he brings us traditional Basque dishes in exchange for our culture-crossing repertoire of meals. He’s still waiting for us to cook something ‘typically British’ and I guess we’re going to have produce fish and chips at some stage.

Needless to say, having Jesus living at the bottom of our garden has been the source of endless puns and ‘double-entendres’ for our friends and family and the fact that he is a healer by the laying on of hands has naturally added fuel to the quips. But for me, the crowning glory of our juvenile blasphemy came last week when we introduced him to Jack’s mum:

“Jesus, meet Mary”.

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