Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘tour’

Before I left the UK to live in Tenerife, I was an avid watcher of programmes like A Place in the Sun, Through the Keyhole and Location, Location, Location.
Okay, I admit it, I’m nosey and seeing around other people’s homes is something I never tire of. But it seems I’m not alone, as all of these programmes attracted millions of equally nosey viewers many of whom, like me, were inspired enough to make the move themselves.

When it comes to buying a new home, particularly if you’re looking to move somewhere abroad, having as much visual information about the property and the area as possible is essential. Photographs are naturally a major tool in any Estate Agent’s kit but having a video of a property goes that step further, allowing you to get a better idea of the size, shape and layout of a property and to see exactly where your new home is located.

Well now you can browse your dream home in the sun from the comfort of your keyboard as Tenerife Magazine has launched their new ‘Through the Keyhole’ feature in which  Sarah Negrin not only provides a whole portfolio of photographs and detailed descriptions, but also takes us on a video tour of properties for sale.

The series kicks off this month with a beautiful house in the very popular residential area of Chayofa which lies in the hills above Los Cristianos and ticks those location, location, location boxes beautifully. Currently on the market with local estate agents Crossley, Morfitt and Lennox, this is one of those perfect properties where all you have to do is move in and make it your very own place in the sun.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Having just spent an idyllic long weekend on La Gomera, it strikes me that most visitors to Tenerife never see anything more of our neighbouring island  than the stunning canvas it lends to the nightly sunset, or glimpses of its shoreline from dolphin watching trips along the Los Gigantes and Los Cristianos coasts. For those who make the effort to take the ferry across the water, a forty minute sailing lands you on an island which is a far cry from the bustle of their Los Cristianos departure point.

La Gomera was once described by a friend who has lived on the island for some 14 years as being shaped like a circular tablecloth that someone has pinched in the centre and raised off the table. Steep barrancos (ravines) create deep folds in the landscape that run from the coast to the central rainforest of Garajonay National Park, making travel a time consuming and sinuous business, and farming a back-breaking toil.

The difficulty of easily traversing such a landscape, combined with rocky coastlines, strong currents and sheer cliffs which prevent the coastline from getting sucked into the Tenerife addiction of beach building, has meant that La Gomera remains mercifully devoid of large resort development. The down side to that equation is that many of La Gomera’s younger generation have abandoned their agricultural inheritance to make the weekly commute to Tenerife for an easier living and bright lights, leaving La Gomera low on economic development opportunities. But the island has seen an influx of (mainly German) immigrants who have invested in renovating traditional properties, opening restaurants and select rural guest houses and cultivating fincas. The end result is an island of rare beauty, unspoilt by tourism.

I’m not a fan of coach tours with their prescriptive itineraries and refreshment stops which often bypass local pockets, but if you want to tour La Gomera in a day, on this occasion it’s probably your best bet. Confident drivers can hire a car at the ferry terminal and explore independently but for anyone who doesn’t have experience of driving abroad and on mountainous roads, letting a coach take the stress has a lot to be said for it.

Those who prefer a more leisurely day can wander around the capital of San Sebastián where the ferry docks and from whence Christopher Columbus set sail on his globe-changing voyage of 6th September 1492. Buildings of note are the iconic Torre del Conde (above), the little church of La Asunción and Columbus’ House where the eponymous hero stayed prior to his epic voyage and which is now a museum. There are shady pavement cafés and restaurants serving very reasonably priced menus del día of typical Canarian cuisine and lots of places to stroll and enjoy the tranquil atmosphere.

Visitors in the north of Tenerife should consider taking a day return flight on BinterCanarias or IslasAirways who fly into the airport a short taxi ride from the resort of Playa Santiago. Best known as the location of the La Tecina Hotel, Playa Santiago has seen a small but steady growth over the past five years and now offers a picturesque marina; a small, black sand beach; nice restaurants with promenade views and a good selection of shops. It’s a laid back, one horse sort of resort where the default setting is sunny and life moves at a ripple pace – the perfect spot in which to enjoy a very different Canary Island for a day.

Read Full Post »